The Circle Voice

Civil Rights For The LGBTQ Community

Leah Pothel '21, Assistant Opinions Editor

October 13, 2019

In 2013, Gerald Bostock was fired for “conduct unbecoming” after he joined a predominantly gay softball league that was created as a safe space for the LGBTQ community in Atlanta. Bostock had worked as the coordinator of child welfare services for a county government office in Georgia. He claimed t...

Piracy of Privacy: FBI Subpoenas

Llocxi Lopez '21

October 13, 2019

Not long ago, times were simpler –– at least technologically. Personal information was kept in cards, logs, and fiche film, and digital privacy laws were weak or nonexistent. However, in this new digital world, law enforcement has begun the widespread collection of personal information through or...

Protecting British Democracy: Boris Johnson Should Resign

Jared Gura and Jiacheng Kang ’22

October 13, 2019

On September 24, the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom unanimously ruled that Prime Minister (PM) Boris Johnson’s suspension of Parliament was unlawful and an obstruction of democracy. The intervention of the Supreme Court underscores the gravity of the situation, as it rarely involves itself in...

Should the Hong Kongers Keep Protesting?

Evan Cheigh, Jiacheng Kang, Steven Pang and Tyler Weisberg ’22

October 13, 2019

On September 4, after months of protests, the Chief Executive of Hong Kong Carrie Lam withdrew the controversial extradition bill that allowed Hong Kongers to be tried in China. The protests, however; did not end there. In fact, they have evolved into a turbulent movement for democracy in Hong Kong that...

Destruction of the Presidency: Anderson’s Authority

Brooks Anderson '20

October 13, 2019

It is an impressive feat to fully extinguish all the prestige and tradition of an office, especially such a vaunted one as the presidency, in only three years. Most presidents attempt to rollback or alter the policy achievements of their predecessors, but none have completely defiled the office itself as ef...

Destruction of the Presidency: Garett’s Gospel

Garrett Johnson '20

October 13, 2019

The greatest myth of the presidency is that the ethical code of the office’s occupant must match the respect the nation owes to the office itself. The office of the president is a symbol of democracy, the embodiment of our trailblazing ability to peacefully transfer power from one opposing side to...

Feel the Bern: Why Sanders is “Most Electable”

Anuj Agarwal '21

September 24, 2019

Many Democratic voters nowadays are concerned with electability. According to August polls conducted by The Economist and YouGov, Democratic voters would rather vote for a candidate who would beat Trump than one who shares their policies. Jill Biden continued to perpetuate this line of thought in her...

A Constitutional Reg Flag

Brooks Anderson '20, President of the Opinions Editorial Board

September 21, 2019

It has become clear to the vast majority of Americans that “thoughts and prayers” are no longer enough. In the wake of the Parkland shooting, there have been numerous calls for legislative action to implement stronger gun control laws on both state and federal levels. These calls have been amplified...

Erosion of Democracy

Erosion of Democracy

Jack Wilmerding '19, Assistant Opinions Editor

February 5, 2019

A recent Groton alumnus, Victor Liu ’17, is currently forbidden from leaving China, with no charges against him. The Chinese authorities are after his father, Liu Changming, an alleged $1.4 billion fraudster who has evaded authorities for years, and they are using Victor and his sister as hostages...

Vaping in America: a Buzzing Issue

Vaping in America: a Buzzing Issue

Jack Wilmerding '19, Assistant Opinions Editor

December 18, 2018

Vaping, particularly Juuling, has wormed its way into high school and college campuses across the country. While the explosion of Juuling is unhealthy for all age groups, it is especially damaging to minors due to nicotine’s effect on developing brains. Per Business Insider, Boston Children’s Hospital...

Khashoggi: Free Speech Martyr or Another Forgotten Victim?

Khashoggi: Free Speech Martyr or Another Forgotten Victim?

Jack Wilmerding '19, Assistant Opinions Editor

November 10, 2018

Jamal Khashoggi is dead, murdered by the government that he so rightfully criticized. He entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul under the premise of getting divorce papers (papers which were redirected from the embassy in Washington, DC) for his upcoming wedding and never left the compound. This was not an “a...

Two Views: Affirmative Action at Harvard

Two Views: Affirmative Action at Harvard

Andrew Porter '20, Derek Hu '21, and Powers Trigg '21

November 10, 2018

Days ago, Harvard University completed defending itself against a lawsuit alleging that it discriminates against Asian American applicants. The suit, undecided at the time The Circle Voice went to press, has invigorated a debate about the merits of affirmative action, a preference given to students fr...

Revisiting Trump’s Letter in the Wake of Midterm Elections

Revisiting Trump’s Letter in the Wake of Midterm Elections

Powers Trigg '20, Assistant Sports Editor

November 10, 2018

Groton has always had a history of public service.  There is perhaps no greater emblem of that tradition than the letters and portraits from the last nineteen presidents of the United States that line the halls of the History Wing. Since the election of Donald J. Trump in the fall of 2016, a debate has ensued a...

The Right to Be “Part of the Resistance”

Tyler Weisberg '22

October 19, 2018

In early September, the New York Times published an anonymous op-ed essay from a senior official of The Trump Administration. It disclosed the dilemmas the President was facing, and how the author believed Trump was not a suitable decision maker for the US. If the identity of this official is disclosed,...

SAT-Optional Admissions Will Fail the Test

SAT-Optional Admissions Will Fail the Test

Andrew Porter '20, Assistant Opinions Editor

September 13, 2018

Last July, the University of Chicago announced that it would be enacting the UChicago Empower Initiative, a test-optional admissions policy mainly intended to serve underserved applicants. This change reflects a growing trend, inaugurated in the late sixties, for colleges to consider ‘the whole studen...

Kavanaugh: Disaster or Opportunity?

Kavanaugh: Disaster or Opportunity?

Brooks Anderson '20, Columnist

September 13, 2018

The Supreme Court is arguably the most powerful national institution; justices’ immense authority coupled with lifelong terms allow a small group to influence American society for generations after their time on the bench. Any change in its makeup consequently has far-reaching effects – the future of the S...

Where Groton Failed in the #NeverAgain Movement

Katie Reveno '20

May 30, 2018

When Annabelle Mata, a close friend and former teammate of mine, walked into school the morning of February 14th, 2018, she didn’t expect anything other than a normal day of classes. She didn’t expect to hear screaming and gunshots while making Valentine’s Day cards in her freshman English class. ...

A Not-So-Balanced Budget

Brooks Anderson '20

March 2, 2018

Oh where, oh where have the deficit hawks gone? I can tell you this much: they’re certainly not on Capitol Hill or in the White House. On January 31, 2010, Representative Paul Ryan said the following about the federal budget: “the debt and the deficit is just getting out of control. And the ad...

A Joint Korean Team is a Step Toward Unity

Brooks Anderson '20

March 2, 2018

On January 17, North and South Korea agreed to march together under one flag and field a joint women’s ice hockey team in the 2018 Winter Olympics. The Koreas’ agreement to field an Olympic team under a flag of unity is a tiny step towards a peaceful resolution of tension on the peninsula. The a...

When the FCC Got Its Way, We Lost More Than Net Neutrality

Jack Wilderding '19

January 19, 2018

What is the Internet? It is a tool for discovery. It is a tool for creators. It stimulates and facilitates modern human progress. The Internet is not only wonderful, but also a necessity in this day and age. This necessity led the net to be classified as a Title II service under the Obama administration,...

Under The New Tax Bill, Everybody Loses

Brooks Anderson '20

January 19, 2018

The recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is remarkably equitable in its effects. If you live in a high-tax blue state, you lose, because you can no longer deduct your state and local taxes from your federal tax return. If you are a teacher, you lose, because you can no longer deduct teaching-related ...

Kim Jong Three, Two, Un: A Nuclear Countdown?

Kim Jong Three, Two, Un: A Nuclear Countdown?

Rajit Khanna '19, Reporter

May 11, 2017

In another of a series of miscues regarding the Trump administration’s North Korea foreign policy, Trump claimed that he was sending an “armada” to the Korean Peninsula. North Korean officials probably had a laugh when news leaked that the “armada,” which included the USS Carl Vinson aircra...

Liberté, égalité, and fraternité win out over malignité

Liberté, égalité, and fraternité win out over malignité

Brooks Anderson '20, Reporter

May 11, 2017

On May 7, the rising wave of populism was halted in its tracks by a crushing loss for the far-right nationalist candidate, Marine Le Pen. Ms. Le Pen, whose ideology, rhetoric, and style parallel that of Dutch politician Geert Wilders and U.S. President Donald Trump, worried many around the world. Sh...

Venezuela, socialist dream turned nightmare? Not so fast

Leo McMahon '19, Reporter

May 11, 2017

Despite what is commonly believed in the United States, Venezuela’s economic and political crises are not the fault of socialism, but the result of incompetent state capitalism and the sabotage of the opposition. In fact, Venezuela is not socialist in the least. Socialism is “social ownership and...

A little less terrible: the fallacy of Obamacare-worship

A little less terrible: the fallacy of Obamacare-worship

Leo McMahon '19, Reporter

April 19, 2017

“Ryancare” (or “Trumpcare,” depending on whom you ask) may have failed to pass the House, thereby saving twenty-eight million Americans from losing their health insurance and between 270,000 and 500,000 people from dying in the next decade, at least according to Vice News. But that doesn’t mea...

Incognito no longer: Congress sells our search histories

Brooks Anderson '20, Reporter

April 19, 2017

On March 28th, the House passed a resolution that dismantles certain Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and bars the Commission from issuing similar rules in the future. The regulations that were rolled back essentially forced ISPs, or Internet Service Providers, to obtain specific opt-in consen...

Sugar, spice, and nothing nice: Sean Spicer, the propagandist

Sugar, spice, and nothing nice: Sean Spicer, the propagandist

Brooks Anderson ‘20

February 23, 2017

Since the advent of the position in 1932 under the Roosevelt administration, the White House press secretary has been the primary spokesperson for the executive branch of the government, according to the JFK Library. The press secretary is responsible for briefing the press corps on issues that conc...

Burqa(n) or Burqa(nt)? Groton’s Muslims share their views

Burqa(n) or Burqa(nt)? Groton’s Muslims share their views

Fran Saldivar '19

January 26, 2017

On January 10, the production and sale of burqas—clothing worn in public by some Islamic women—was banned in all of Morocco for security reasons. A burqa is a full-body garment that covers the neck and head of the wearer; a mesh screen conceals the face while allowing her to see out. The Moroccan go...

“Yuge” Thumbs of fury: Trump and Twitter

“Yuge” Thumbs of fury: Trump and Twitter

Brooks Anderson '20

January 26, 2017

One of the most remarkable things about this recent election cycle was the condemnation of so-called mainstream media from both sides of the spectrum. Both Senator Bernie Sanders and President Donald Trump were outspoken against what they deemed unfair media coverage, although Mr. Trump certainly go...

Peeping Putin: Russian election hacking hysteria

Peeping Putin: Russian election hacking hysteria

Leo McMahon '19

January 26, 2017

Of all the claims that the 2016 election was somehow skewed, the most unsettling—and delegitimizing to President Donald Trump’s election—is that of Russian interference in the election.   Inevitably, Democrats and Republicans have squared off, debating whether this hacking means Trum...

Gilded Age President? Trump’s not-so-populist plans

Gilded Age President? Trump’s not-so-populist plans

Charlie Vrattos '18

January 26, 2017

With the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump and the convening of a Republican-dominated House and Senate, it is clear that America is in for some radical policy changes. AFter eagerly awaiting this moment for eight years of the Obama administration, Republican congressmen will not delay instituting thes...

Thanks, Obama

Thanks, Obama

Michael Xiao ‘18

December 14, 2016

For the last eight years, Barack Obama has led the executive branch of the United States with more than his fair share of controversy. However, with the spotlight on President-Elect Trump and the impassioned opposition his victory has caused, President Obama’s imminent departure from the White House ...

Concessions and Victories: The world on November 9th

Concessions and Victories: The world on November 9th

Roselle Lovell-Smith ‘18

December 14, 2016

The results of the presidential election on November 8th came as a shock. Most sources predicted a Secretary Clinton win by a significant margin or had her winning the Electoral College while losing the popular vote. The election was almost certain to go to Mr. Trump by early on the 9th. Despite thi...

After 229 years, it’s time to graduate from the Electoral College

After 229 years, it’s time to graduate from the Electoral College

Marianne Lu ‘19

December 14, 2016

The Electoral College is made up of 538 electors who cast votes to decide the President and Vice-President. This system was established in 1877, at a time when the federal government did not trust its citizens to vote directly for their senators or president. And although we now vote directly for our se...

My only regret is that I have but one can of spray paint

My only regret is that I have but one can of spray paint

October 21, 2016

Here’s a fun fact: a current United States presidential candidate has a warrant out for her arrest. To the disappointment of about fifty percent of Americans, I’m talking about Jill Stein, the Green Party’s current candidate for President of the United States. On September 7 of this year, a judge...

Breaking the (terror empathy) barrier

By LEO MCMAHON ‘19

October 7, 2016

Taking the volume of media coverage as an indicator of terror attacks, it would be fair to assume that the world was destroying itself in an inferno of terror. However, the incidence of terrorism actually decreased worldwide in 2015, increasing only in the West, a region subjected to few terror attacks...

Something red, something blue, something’s missing?

Something red, something blue, something’s missing?

Powers Trigg '20

October 7, 2016

At the first presdidential debate on September 26th, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had a battle for the ages in front of a record-setting audience. It was quite a performance from both candidates. Trump used his traditional style of aggressive and combative tactics, scoring points with some great...

On hashtags and haters

On hashtags and haters

October 7, 2016

A record-breaking total of eighty million viewers tuned in to the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on September 26. And that figure from CNN Money doesn’t even include online viewers. The record to beat was the 1980 debate between Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. With...

Trust me, you’re wrong

Trust me, you’re wrong

Nina Norton '18

October 7, 2016

At Groton there are three different types of students: Students who are extremely democratic/liberal, students who are highly republican/conservative, and students who still think Bernie is a candidate. I have no problem with being political—in fact, I think it’s very important for us, as adolescents,...

John Oliver: a Journalist, a Propogandist, or Neither?

John Oliver: a Journalist, a Propogandist, or Neither?

June 5, 2016

Since its inception in April of 2014, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver has attracted remarkably large numbers of viewers—among them many Groton students—with its comedic commentaries on a variety of issues in America, ranging from the "NSA’s detailed programs" to "putting a cowboy hat on a c...